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Welcome to Detail Movement!

Hi, I'm Raluca. I am an interior designer & the founder of Detail Movement, the place where casual interiors are born for people with stories to tell. Sharing industry knowledge through the Blog and inspirational visuals through Photography. Feel free to have a look around. Enjoy!

How To Measure Up A Room

How To Measure Up A Room

Hey peeps! I received quite a few emails from some of you guys, asking about what's the best way to measure up your rooms. As your wish is my command (naturally), I've put together this post for you with all the information that you need. Once you know how designers, architects and specialists in general, take surveys and measure up rooms, you'll be able to do this on your own. It is a bit more than just measuring up a wall, but fear not, I've got you covered. 

SO LET'S START WITH THE BASICS.

Here's what you'll need: a piece of paper or a notebook (you'll have loads of info to write down, so it's best to have them all in one place); a measuring tape and something to write with - your choice.

The first thing you need to do is draw up the layout of your room you wish to change. Take a second to look around and see what you've got. Here is an example of a plan for an apartment and a legend with what everything means. You don't need to draw up everything of course, but you can make notes of whatever it is that you think it will be useful to you later down the road. And trust me, it will come in handy. But we will start with something smaller and easier.

Plan with furniture - ©Detail Movement

Plan with furniture - ©Detail Movement

Plan legend - ©Detail Movement

Plan legend - ©Detail Movement

So let's say you have the plan below. You have drawn up the rooms you are interested in changing. You can start up by measuring the whole length of a wall and then measure up the bits that compose that wall (or you can go the other way around). What I mean by bits is when you have a wall that has a door or windows in it or just has some architectural details that are large enough that they need to be measured. 

It does not matter the order in which you take the measurements, as long as you take all of them. Why is this important? Well, you need these so that you can find out how much paint or wallpaper you need if you wish to redesign the walls for example. Every bit of information helps.

Plan - ©Detail Movement

Plan - ©Detail Movement

Plan measurements 2 - ©Detail Movement

It is always good to try and take both measurements (as you see in the picture above), because that way you can double check to see is the measurements are correct.

IT'S BEST TO TAKE YOUR MEASUREMENTS IN MILLIMETRES IN ORDER TO BE MORE ACCURATE.

So, for example, in the smaller bottom left room (which now you know that if it is tiled, it's most likely to be a bathroom), you measured up the whole length at 3850 mm. Now you measured up again, including the opening of the door and you get 1450 - 900 - 1500. If you add them up, you get 3850.  Don't worry if you get measurements like 897 mm, you can just round them (like 897 to 900 mm).

There might be times when you see that the measurements differ from one side of the room to the either. If you recheck your measurements and the result is still the same, then it simply means that the walls of the room are not so straight. This means that you don't have a square or rectangular shaped room, you have walls that are positioned in a diagonal way (more or less). This can be a construction error or something else, but it's usually a "movement" of a couple of millimetres or centimetres. Also, it's not that visible to the eye (you only discovered it after measuring up the room). So don't worry if you notice something like that. I've kind of exaggerated on the plan (if you add up my exemplary measurements), but you get the idea.

Plan measurements 4 - ©Detail Movement

Plan measurements 4 - ©Detail Movement

Now, if you ever find that your drawings get very heavy or crowded in annotations (and they usually do), you can always add the new info outside the plan. Just make sure to write down from where a measurement starts and stops. As long as it makes sense to you and you understand which measurement is for which part, then you are free to get creative "outside the box".

ALWAYS ADD THE AREA OF THE ROOM.

Another important note that you need to remember is to write down the area of the room. Of course, you can do this any given time if you have the overall measurements of the room. Just remember to do it. Why is this important? It's useful for when you'll look into buying flooring materials. For example, let's say you want to change the carpet or wooden floors in a room. You will need to know the area of the room, in order to see how many square metres you'll need to buy. Simple as that.

At the same time, this particular note is also important if you go furniture shopping. If you know how much space you have, you'll know which pieces of furniture (and how many of them) will fit in your room.

WHAT MOST PEOPLE FORGET TO DO IS ALSO MEASURE UP THE  WALLS OF THE ROOM.

Ok, this might not seem like it is something of importance, but it is actually something very useful that you need to take into account as well. Imagine you want to buy new furniture for your Living Room. You take all the measurements required, you go into the store and buy the pieces of furniture that you wanted. You come back to your flat/house and you place the sofa next to a wall. But some time later, you want to plug in your laptop into the socket that is behind the sofa. That's when you realise that the sofa is in the way and you cannot plug anything in without first moving it all together (every single time).

It's important to document how your walls look and take necessary measurements for the positions of electrical sockets, radiators etc. The more informed you are, the better your decisions will be later down the road, thus saving you both time and money in the process.

Plan notes  - ©Detail Movement

Plan notes  - ©Detail Movement

SO HERE IS HOW YOU CAN DO JUST THAT.

Use a different plan if the previous one is full of so many notes that you can barely have any room left to add something. I would recommend naming your rooms or give them a number so that it is easier for you to know which one is which. I always name the walls, either with a letter or a number, so that when I draw the walls of the room, I know which wall has the sockets or radiators and which one has windows etc.

You can also take pictures of the walls, so that when you do go shopping for anything, it's easier for you to make proper decisions based on photos, rather than a memory (which might not be that accurate). In the industry, designers mark this process down on the plan. For example, they make a sign from where (and which angle) they took a certain picture and they add a number as well. It's all about making it fast and easy for you to remember where is everything.

Elevations - ©Detail Movement

Elevations - ©Detail Movement

After you've drawn up the walls of the room you plan to re-design or make changes to, all that is left to do is add the measurements to anything that is of interest to you: sockets, radiators, the height of the windows, doors, even the full height of the room.

Elevations and hardware  - ©Detail Movement

Elevations and hardware  - ©Detail Movement

Elevations and hardware 2 - ©Detail Movement

Elevations and hardware 2 - ©Detail Movement

So this is all you need to do, my detail lovers. This is how you can measure up a room and make sure that you have all the information right and at hand (for when you go shopping)! It might sound like it's a tedious job, but once you start, you might find it to be quite fun. Plus, you are doing this for a noble cause - designing your room!

Have you done this before? Or are planning on taking on a project and you just needed a bit of info on how to start correctly? Let me know if you find this useful or not. Would love to know your thoughts. So share them with me here or on my Facebook Page - it's your choice. Either way, I look forward to hearing your experiences.

Good luck!!

Raluca x

All images and videos that are credited as '©Detail Movement', are done by Raluca Vaduva for Detail Movement. All rights reserved. All pictures that are not my own, I credit them to the best of my knowledge & research, to their online sources. I do not claim ownership over them in any way.

 

 

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